Six weeks on…(giving up TV)

Thank you very much for all the support and sponsorship I’ve received so far. Last month, I decided to do the unthinkable (for me anyway) and not watch any television, or DVDs, for SEVEN weeks until 3rd April 2013. This will mean missing my favourite TV show of all time, as a new series starts at the end of March. However, I’ve now decided to extend this to 7th April 2013 – as I wanted to complete another full week, so that will be EIGHT weeks.

Although this started off as an idea for something to give up during Lent, I’ve decided to extend it and make it a seven week marathon; all so I can try and raise some money for the wonderful Living by Giving Trust.

It’s all going well so far, and I’ve now completed SIX weeks of no television, and have now decided to extend my sponsored no TV till the 13th April.

It may seem like a trivial quest, but for me it’s a very hard thing to do. Although, by the same token, I’m well aware that my trial is nothing when compared to the plight of others – that is why I’m doing it, to help them.

Any sponsorship that you, lovely reader, can give towards the Living by Giving Trust would be very much appreciated. All money will go towards the many projects that the charity supports. All our projects are to help give young people new experiences, take a look at our projects so far: http://www.livingbygivingtrust.com/projects. More to come..

You can donate here: http://www.bmycharity.com/givingupTV.

Two weeks on…(Giving up TV)

As you may have read on the Living by Giving Trust news page, I’ve decided to do the unthinkable (for me anyway) and not watch any television, or DVDs, for SEVEN weeks until 3rd April 2013. This will mean missing my favourite TV show of all time, as a new series starts at the end of March.

Although this started off as an idea for something to give up during Lent, I’ve decided to extend it and make it a seven week marathon; all so I can try and raise some money for the wonderful Living by Giving Trust.

So, two weeks on my friends are all asking me – how is it going? The truth is that the first week was easy, because I was ill for most of it. Not that being ill was easy, but it did mean that I had no real interest in television. However, by the second week, I was feeling a little better and found myself missing it lots.

The problem is that watching television is how I relax each evening, and suddenly I have to find other ways to do that. Unfortunately – for my sanity – at first, I decided to utilise this extra time by doing more chores around the house and actual real-life work. This was a mistake, as I felt even more drained than usual each day. Thankfully, I soon passed this mad stage, and I’ve now settled down to doing other things in the evening: reading one of my many as yet unread books; listening to the radio; writing an article or two, and more.

It may seem like a trivial quest, but for me it’s a very hard thing to do. Although, by the same token, I’m well aware that my trial is nothing when compared to the plight of others – that is why I’m doing it, to help them.

Any sponsorship that you, lovely reader, can give towards the Living by Giving Trust would be very much appreciated. All money will go towards the many projects that the charity supports.

You can donate here: http://www.bmycharity.com/givingupTV.

For more information on these, please visit our website: http://www.livingbygivingtrust.com/projects/

An opportunity of a lifetime…

The CA Hospitalite organises to take sick and disabled adults to Lourdes each year for a week’s holiday. The CA Hospitalite needs many volunteer helpers to come along and look after the guests, and the Living by Giving Trust assisted three helpers to go along in 2011.

Here Robert Bigge talks about his experience and time in Lourdes:
“AN OPPORTUNITY OF A LIFETIME
On a sunny Thursday in August 2011 I left London on the first leg of my trip with the Catholic Association to Lourdes as a Helper. We travelled by coach down to Dover where we were booked on a ferry to Calais.
When I boarded the coach it was full of new faces and I a nervous face stared back. Not knowing anybody was a little daunting but its the best way to get to know people on a 20 hour trip to Lourdes. Having to talk to a total stranger, whom by the end of the trip I could call a friend.
After a long journey we reached Lourdes on Friday evening and booked into our hotel rooms. Most of the Party were from my school in Croydon, we all unpacked and were down at dinner eager to develop friendships with both boys and girls we had only just met, some shared stories of Lourdes if they had been before and there was a great sense of excitement amongst the group.
On Saturday I was given my rota of jobs and we got stuck in straight away. I was asked to push Mary around in a wheelchair, our first visit was to hit the souvenir shops, I quickly worked out they were all selling very much the same things but Mary was eager to see if there were any new arrivals or bargains she had missed but I think it was an excuse to bump into people and have a chat. Mary was probably in her 70s she was such a great person to talk and good company she made me feel comfortable even though I had the responsibility of wheeling her around, it was amazing to share the ‘torchlight’ evening procession with her, she made ME feel welcome and she was not demanding at all.
After three days with Mary we said our goodbyes. I then met John and had the pleasure of him taking me around Lourdes for another couple of days. Well John was hysterical, he was so cheerful and great fun, he cracked jokes all the time and I could see why he had been to Lourdes 28 times – as well as being a holy place to visit its also a place to have fun and make friends and never be lonely. Physically John had many needs and it was a pleasure to be there to support him. I learnt that even though they are old Mary and John had so much to give.
Lunchtimes were spent back at the hotel enjoying the lovely lunch and dinner was there too – we never went hungry!
On my rota I had one evening duty at the Hospital and the rest of the evenings were spent with our group in the local bars where the atmosphere is amazing, lots of chat and impromptu singing, you find that you are all drawn to each other in a common bond.
I also had one duty which involved an early start, 5.30am – but it made the day last longer and meant I could spend more time awake and alive in Lourdes.
I went for myself and I was surprised at what I had achieved an opportunity in my lifetime not to be missed. I really want to go back next year and to get more of the boys from my 6th Form at the John Fisher School to come too – I know they will have a great time on a working holiday.
Robert Bigge